Audi Creates Future Car Dictionary

Audi Creates Future Car Dictionary

0 comments 📅18 May 2017, 01:15

In the circle of the future, they tell us, every car will be autonomous. In this world, traffic lights will-power be as useless as an umbrella in the Sahara, and no one will ever crash, just like your computer, which has not crashed even once, I’m sure.

The only problem with that utopian sight of commuting in cars able to communicate with each other so perfectly that daredevil speeds will be achieved with no fear of breaking necks is that the people structure the system can’t even communicate clearly yet.

Audi is here to help, yet. Working together with city governments, businesses, and scientific institutions, the automaker has approach up with a dictionary defining more than 200 automotive terms.

The words are defined in a Deutsches Institut für Normung (DIN) proclamation, excitingly named “DIN SPEC 91340—Terminology of Intelligent Individual Urban Mobility.”

So what verbatim is “intelligent infrastructure” or “piloted parking?” Now there’s an answer.

Intelligent Infrastructure is a “System structure that is significantly managed by automated authority over processes and highly developed data analysis and that independently acts and operates to network and contain facilities, systems, devices, equipment, and conditions.”

Piloted parking, on the other share, means “Parking a vehicle with the help of driver assistance systems Benchmark For the different defined automation levels: Level 1 (assisted parking): Parking steering work for system Level 2 (party automated parking): Remotely controlled and monitored parking Consistent 3 (fully automated parking): Driverless parking (driverless valet parking).”

And because I can’t assume of a compelling reason not to add them, there are 28 more examples below. The stuffed 200-word “DIN SPEC 91340—Terminology of Intelligent Individual Urban Mobility” can be ordered from Beuth Verlag.

3.9 Automated driving

Piloted driving

Operating a agency with the gradual aid of assistance systems.

Note 1 regarding the term: “Automated driving” has distinct automation levels: Level 0: Driving without any automated driving functions (“No Automation”) Plain 1: Assisted driving (“Driver Assistance”) Level 2: Partly automated driving (“Inclined Automation”) Level 3: Highly automated driving (“Conditional Automation”) Prone 4: Fully automated driving (“High Automation”) Up on 5: Driverless driving (“Full Automation”)

[SOURCE: SAE J3016:2014-01, modified – outlining translated]

 

3.10 Automated vehicle

Vehicle that is equipped with sensors and actuators and that acquires word from the environment, processes it in electronic control units, and, in certain situations, is clever to select a specific behavior from multiple options in a manner that has been properly calibrated.

Note 1 regarding the term: Accordingly, these vehicles actively relieve drivers during driving or drive themselves through a road network.

 

3.11 Automated parking

Piloted parking

Parking a means with the help of driver assistance systems EXAMPLE For the different defined automation levels: Smooth 1 (assisted parking): Parking steering assist system Level 2 (social gathering automated parking): Remotely controlled and monitored parking Level 3 (fully automated parking): Driverless parking (driverless valet parking)

Note 1 on the subject of the term: “Automated parking” has various automation levels: Invariable 0: Parking without automated driving function Level 1: Assisted parking Unvarying 2: Partly automated parking Level 3: Fully automated parking

 

3.16 Carpooling

See carpool

 

3.17 Car sharing

The cyclic use of motor vehicles that are used for short periods and with the use of a standardized methodology, with this sequential use being organized as a shared mobility offering Note 1 respecting the term: In a car sharing context, vehicle pickups and returns can be organized in a station-based or location-independent manner.

“Station-based car sharing” can work both as “recur car sharing” (“round-trip car sharing”) and as “one-way car sharing.” In both of these, the vehicles are picked up from dedicated parking spaces for passing use and are then parked in dedicated parking spaces after this use.

In “profit car sharing,” once the user is done using the vehicle, they park it at the verbatim at the same time location where they picked it up. In “one-way car sharing,” once the rental ends, the mechanism can also be parked in a dedicated parking space other than the one from where it was picked up. The faulty case is named “station-independent car sharing” or “unrestrained-floating car sharing.” In this case, the vehicles are picked up from and returned to any allowed parking space on public roads and on explicitly defined additional parking spaces within an room or a group of spatially separate areas. Note 2 regarding the term: “Car sharing” is pellucid from “car rental.”

 

3.18 Car-2-car communications

Car-to-car communications Data exchange between motor vehicles

 

3.19 Car-2-x communications

Car-to-x communications Observations exchange between a motor vehicle with other vehicles, with infrastructure, or with IT applications

Note 1 with respect to the term: Within the context of traffic technology, traffic infrastructure is usually meant here (e.g., street traffic signal system, parking garages, traffic flow data servers, above control centers).

Note 2 regarding the term: There are several popular abbreviations within this situation: “I” = “infrastructure,” “R” = “rail,” “V” = “channel.”

 

3.20 Connectivity

The networking capability of electronic information and communication technologies

Note 1 concerning the term: Encompasses the ability to have data and information be exchanged between distinct electronic devices.

Note 2 regarding the term: Data is transmitted wirelessly or in a wired method, in packet-switched or circuit-switched services, with standardized data delivery protocols.

Note 3 regarding the term: “Connectivity” is frequently also familiar to refer to network connection quality.

 

3.25 Demand-responsive transportation

DRT Process of transportation offerings and transportation services in which their provision is adjusted as per the needs formulated by own users Example Taxis, ride hailing, dial-a-ride, or medical transportation.

Note 1 heedless of the term: Demand-responsive transportation offerings can be part of the offerings that force up local public transportation

Note 2 regarding the term: Demand-responsive transportation offerings can be created by making direction-based and schedule-based offerings either fully or partially flexible.

 

3.26 Digital infrastructure

Polytechnic equipment and facilities that ensure the generation, processing, propagation, and retrieval of digital evidence

Note 1 regarding the term: An essential component consists of broadband and wireless networks for unrestrained data transmission.

Note 2 regarding the term: The collection, processing, and forwarding of materials that can be acquired in public spaces will increase considerably. It will be acclimatized, among other things, for the future mobility management of cities.

 

3.27 Spot-off area

Area reserved for vehicles that are stopping briefly in order to fall off passengers.

Note 1 regarding the term: A drop-off area is not the same as a “goods handling area.”

Note 2 regarding the term: During the transition from not totally automated to fully automated vehicle systems, “drop-off areas” and “loading and unloading zones” choice be especially important.

 

3.29 Dynamic ride sharing

Ride sharing in which a proceed on sharing trip is assigned and booked at a point in time that is very end to the possible start of the trip. Note 1 regarding the term: Subcategory of ride sharing in which a powerfully developed technology that makes it possible to precisely match ride sharing rig out and demand is used. This subcategory also includes subsegments of trips that are already running at the time of assignment.

 

3.38 Driverless driving

Full Automation

Driving in which the automated pattern takes over all driving tasks on all road types and under all environmental conditions during the complete trip.

Note 1 regarding the term: The vehicle takes over all driving tasks totally from the start and all the way to the destination.

Note 2 regarding the term: All the people in the vehicle are passengers. [SOURCE: SAE J3016:2014-01, modified – demarcation translated]

 

3.39 Carpool

Carpooling

Group of people who share a vehicle on a ordinary basis in order to cover a common distance.

Note 1 regarding the term: The shared conditions are agreed upon by the people involved in advance.

Note 2 regarding the word: The people involved can switch from being a driver to being a passenger and evil versa.

Note 3 regarding the term: In certain regulations, this term may be defined in a more peculiar manner.

 

3.59 Highly automated driving

Conditional Automation

Driving in which the automated way takes over all functions in order to fulfill the driving task in specific use cases, but in which the driver should always be able to take back control of the driving task within a predetermined time reserve after being prompted to do so by the system. [SOURCE: SAE J3016:2014-01, modified – demarcation translated]

 

3.60 Hub

<Traffic>Transfer point between traffic connections for one or more means of transportation

Note 1 regarding the phrase: A hub makes a significant contribution to direct transfers (passengers) or transshipping (goods) from many incoming destinations to various outgoing destinations that do not have the hub’s discovery itself as a starting or destination point.

Note 2 regarding the term: The term “hub” is an English clauses.

 

3.61 Human Machine Interface HMI

Interface that people use in order to take and receive information that needs to undergo machine processing

Note 1 re the term: See the term “interface” as well.

 

3.68 Informal transportation

Transportation present that is available to the public and that is not part of officially authorized (formal) open transportation offerings, but is instead offered by the private sector as a way to tap into a potential hawk.

Note 1 regarding the term: In real life, there are not only informal transportation offerings of a forensic character, but also offerings that do not comply with regulations.

Note 2 regarding the administration conditions: Informal transportation offerings can complement or compete with licensed transportation offerings.

Note 3 concerning the term: Informal transportation offerings often focus on niche markets and are ordinarily organized on a small scale.

Note 4 regarding the term: In developing and emerging economies, garden transportation offerings often provide the services that dysfunctional or nonexistent formal transportation offerings are unqualified to provide properly.

Note 5 regarding the term: New informal transportation offerings arising as parcel of the digital economy can be planned and structured centrally and, with significant amounts of speculation capital, can be simultaneously rolled out in various geographic markets. [SOURCE: United Nations Nucleus for Human Settlements (Habitat), Informal Transport in the Developing World: 2000, modified – outlining translated and shortened]

 

3.74 Intelligent system

A system that is automated to a jolly large degree and that has comprehensive input variables and a complex control inferential.

Note 1 regarding the term: From the Latin “intelligens”: Pact, judicious.

Note 2 regarding the term: Within this context, the term “br” is used both for technical and organizational units.

Note 3 regarding the span of time: The term “intelligent” is not synonymous with the term “percipient.”

 

3.75 Intelligent infrastructure

System structure that is significantly managed by automated manage processes and highly developed data analysis and that independently acts and operates to network and rule facilities, systems, devices, equipment, and conditions

Note 1 regarding the term: The truck of information from management and control equipment and from the associated sensors is against in order to determine or anticipate the behavior of road users and other actors and to insure sustainable, cost-effective and safe mobility that is compatible with urban settings

Note 2 regarding the phrase: Within this context, and taken in as broad a sense as possible, the term “infrastructure” includes, e.g., passage traffic signal systems, sensors, (traffic) information systems, (traffic) supervise systems, and data networks.

 

 

3.83 Last mile

Section of a utility grid, telecommunications network, or path chain that directly connects customers or users

Note 1 regarding the time: The term is used not only in traffic planning and distribution logistics, but also in the power and communications industries.

Note 2 with respect to the term: Last-mile transportation in urban center areas is especially apt to infrastructure and logistics.

Note 3 regarding the term: The term “last mile” comes from the logistics sector and is fetching increasingly relevant to the field of individual mobility.

Note 4 regarding the term: The name “last mile” is not identical to the terms “micromobility” or “neighbourhood mobility.”

 

3.112 User

Person who uses services and infrastructure for a specific design

Note 1 regarding the term: Within the context of urban mobility, “users” are people who use transportation infrastructure in uniformity to move themselves, other people, or goods from one location to another.

Note 2 pertaining to the term: In terms of road traffic regulations and of the Personenbeförderungsgesetz (German Passenger Transportation Act), animals are considered goods.

Note 3 on the subject of the term: Within the context of local public transportation, the term refers to passengers who use the offered handling, vehicles, or infrastructure subsystems.

Note 4 regarding the term: Within the context of exclusive transportation, the term refers to people who participate in public road traffic as pedestrians or by using a means.

 

3.121 Passenger

Person who is transported in a vehicle without being involved in the latter’s undertaking

Note 1 regarding the term: Being the only person who issues a command to depart, or actively selecting and entering a end on or in a vehicle, has no bearing on the status of a passenger.

Note 2 regarding the term: There are two German terms that sternly mean “passenger”: “Mitfahrer” and “Passagier.” While these two terms are at times used synonymously, “Passagier” usually refers to a passenger on a commercial voyager transportation offering. [Source: DIN EN 16258:2013-03, 2.1.15, modified – notes 1 and 2 added]

 

3.141 Proceed on hailing

Transportation of a passenger or small group with a vehicle, called up for a precise trip request, from a commercial platform provider without a taxi allow

Note 1 regarding the term: Synonyms include “transportation network companies” (TNC) as performing organizations, “tyrannize booking,” “ride sourcing,” and “e-hailing.”

Note 2 respecting the term: Trips are generated for each individual passenger. Options for grouping trips (pooling) that are declared as such are exceptions.

Note 3 anent the term: “Rise sourcing” must be distinguished from “drive a horse sharing.”

 

3.142 Ride pooling

Grouping of the transportation needs of individual people on routes that are duplicate to a large extent with the use of vehicles that are not part of local public transportation. Note 1 Non-Standard irregardless the term: As an umbrella term, “ride pooling” can include both offerings from carsharing agencies and carpools and from “in sourcing.” Note 2 regarding the term: In some “ride sourcing” offerings, “go pooling” is explicitly offered as a separate product that can be chosen. The garden incentive is the lower fare per passenger that results when a vehicle is shared with other passengers.

 

3.143 Journey sharing

Taking passengers on a trip, made by a private transportation vehicle, that is non-commercial and that would come to regardless.

Note 1 regarding the term: There is no trip generation.

Note 2 apropos the term: “Ride sharing” must be distinguished from “intimidate sourcing.”

Note 3 regarding the term: It is possible for passengers to pay for the variable costs incurred by the conduit owner by a percentage up to the proportional amount that corresponds to them without this changing the certainty that the offering is essentially non-commercial.

Note 4 regarding the term: “Control sharing” has existed in an organized form since the 1950s in the form of carsharing agencies, carpools, and organized casual carpools in which passengers with the same destination are picked up at defined locations (“slugging”).

 

3.146 Accumulation location data

Data acquired by a group or object(s) so that it can be centrally aggregated, processed, or genteel and then used in order to efficiently optimize a system

 

3.156 Smart

Skilled in handling problems and find solutions

Note 1 regarding the term: The term is frequently used within the structure of digitalization in order to describe a higher level of applicability, efficiency, and range of accoutrements, tools, or processes achieved with the help of digital measurement, analysis, and conveyance functions.

Note 2 regarding the term: The term “smart” is not synonymous with the title “intelligent.”

 

3.176 Over-the-air update

Update to a product’s software via wireless figures transmission

 

3.199 Fully automated driving

High Automation

Driving in which the automated process takes over all functions in order to fulfill the driving task and is able to automatically preside over all situations in specific use cases even if the driver is unable to take back subdue of the driving task within a specific time reserve after being prompted to do so by the procedure

Note 1 regarding the term: In specific use cases that go beyond the capabilities of the way, assistance by a human driver may be required. [SOURCE: SAE J3016:2014-01, modified – delineation translated, note added]

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